Outline of Albert Einstein

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Albert Einstein:

Albert Einstein – deceased German-born theoretical physicist. He developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics).[1][2]:274 Einstein's work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science.[3][4] Einstein is best known by the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation").[5] He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the evolution of quantum theory. Einstein published more than 300 scientific papers along with over 150 non-scientific works.[6] Einstein's intellectual achievements and originality have made the word "Einstein" synonymous with "genius".[7]

  1. ^ Whittaker, E. (1 November 1955). "Albert Einstein. 1879–1955". Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society. 1: 37–67. doi:10.1098/rsbm.1955.0005. JSTOR 769242.
  2. ^ Fujia Yang; Joseph H. Hamilton (2010). Modern Atomic and Nuclear Physics. World Scientific. ISBN 978-981-4277-16-7.
  3. ^ Don A. Howard, ed. (2014) [First published 11 February 2004], "Einstein's Philosophy of Science", Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (website), The Metaphysics Research Lab, Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI), Stanford University, retrieved 2015-02-04
  4. ^ Don A. Howard (December 2005), "Albert Einstein as a Philosopher of Science" (PDF), Physics Today, American Institute of Physics, 58 (12): 34–40, Bibcode:2005PhT....58l..34H, doi:10.1063/1.2169442, retrieved 2015-03-08 – via University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, author's personal webpage
  5. ^ David Bodanis (2000). E = mc2: A Biography of the World's Most Famous Equation. New York: Walker.
  6. ^ Paul Arthur Schilpp, ed. (1951), Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist, II, New York: Harper and Brothers Publishers (Harper Torchbook edition), pp. 730–746. His non-scientific works include: About Zionism: Speeches and Lectures by Professor Albert Einstein (1930), "Why War?" (1933, co-authored by Sigmund Freud), The World As I See It (1934), Out of My Later Years (1950), and a book on science for the general reader, The Evolution of Physics (1938, co-authored by Leopold Infeld).
  7. ^ Result of WordNet Search for Einstein, 3.1, The Trustees of Princeton University, retrieved 2015-01-04

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